My writing manifesto.

I’m a writer.

I can’t remember a time in my life when I wasn’t writing every day. In fact, every important thing I’ve ever experienced is recorded in written form.

I even chose to study writing. Sometime during my first year at university, I stumbled across a major called “Communication of Science, Engineering and Technology”. I immediately latched on.

When I look back, I can see my personal evolution as a writer. The tools and context have changed, of course: I kept diaries until 2010, when I switched to blogging. I would buy leather Moleskin journals and blue-black ink pens in sets of 12, but now I spend that money on my own domain name.

But the most important change is the purpose of my writing. It’s no longer a record or expression of self.

Today, I write to communicate. Over time I’ve learned that words have power, so I’ve become frustrated by writing that hides its meaning behind poetic language or jargon.

Today, I am interested in making sense. And because clear communication has to go beyond words, that’s what I do: I use everything I can to perfect the “user experience” of information.

Besides going easy on my readers, I’ve picked up another trick: Having something worthwhile to write about.

See, sometimes words come as an after-thought. Designers, engineers, scientists, and developers will create something amazing, but they won’t know how to talk about it, much less describe it in three neat paragraphs, or pages. So, I have become a “translator” for those designers, engineers, scientists and developers — for people who create information.

Yes, writers have to know where to put a paragraph break, but they also have to care about people who seek information.

I’m a writer, and that’s my writing manifesto: I care.